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Chemical, Universal and Hazardous Waste

Image of Chemical, Universal and Hazardous Waste

Some School District of Philadelphia facilities generate chemical waste from science laboratories, shop classes and maintenance activities.  Each school has a procedure for ordering and disposing of chemicals according to appropriate federal/state/local regulatory requirements.  Also, each school should have Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) for all chemicals located in the facility.  The MSDSs should be collated in an organized fashion and located in the Principal’s Office and in an area where chemicals are stored and/or used.


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Chemical Management Plan, Science + Chemicals = A Safer Green Environment

A Guide for Science Teachers within the School District of Philadelphia

  • Internal policies on  chemicals purchasing, including a list of approved chemicals and associated Safety Data Sheets (SDS);

  • Chemical safety information, such as proper storage and best management pracitces in the laboratory; and

  • Chemical disposal proceedures.

 

The plan also provides information on how to incorperate green chemistry practices including tips to scale down experiments and substitute material without reducing the experience for students.

DO NOT DISPOSE OF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS IN THE TRASH OR RECYCLING:

  • Fluorescent lamps
  • Light bulbs with mercury
  • Emergency lights
  • Small sealed lead acid batteries
  • Electronic devices with cathode ray tubes i.e computer monitors(non flat panel) and TV’s
  • Blood pressure meters
  • Non-empty aerosol cans
  • Mercury containing products such as
    • vacuum gauges
    • medical devices
    • thermostats & thermometers
    • switches
    • gas flow regulators
    • novelties with mercury added

For disposal, school administrators should call their Facility Area Coordinator who will make arrangements with OEMS.

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In addition to the above mentioned materials, all District facilities routinely generate electronic or technology wastes, including:

  • outdated computers
  • televisions
  • cathode ray tubes
  • other electronic components

 

The Office of Information Technology is responsible for the disposal of technology waste.  Technology waste disposal services can be arranged by calling Educational Technology at (215) 400-4420.